risk

2017: A Year in Review

As the year rapidly draws to a close, at Terrafirma, we thought we would summarise this amazing year, including providing a top 5 of our #WhatLiesBeneath blog and our key 2017 events.

2017 has been a year of change at Terrafirma. Time and resource was invested in the Terrafirma brand, sales, marketing and educational material – creating a recognisable and professional brand identity for the first time, embodied by our new website terrafirmasearch.co.uk and our tagline ‘understand the ground’.

In 2017, Terrafirma provided over 250 hours of training, workshop and Continued Professional Development for professionals across the UK. We have also focussed our academic projects on exploring the hidden hazards that the ground can pose – including an industry-first analysis of sinkholes in the UK. This analysis cumulated in late November with a three-part documentary series exploring Sinkholes, on Channel 5. Terrafirma were heavily involved in the research and production material for the series and Terrafirma CEO, Tom Backhouse, co-hosted an episode investigating the impact of mining sinkholes on people, property and investment across the UK and the world.

As we look back on this exciting year and our mission to continually educate professionals and the public to the risks that the ground poses we have picked out our top five events and the top five ‘What lies Beneath’ blog posts:

Could the Wednesbury 'Sinkhole' have been predicted?

The formation of a ‘sinkhole’ beneath a property in Wednesbury, West Midlands has received abundant coverage from the mainstream media during the last week. At Terrafirma, we have been looking into this event to try and understand more about its cause and wider context.

Protect Property with a Professional Opinion.

The age of solely relying on data in environmental risk assessment is over, with a visible shift in the way professionals perceive risks such as contaminated land and flood. Where historically data alone was enough to accept due diligence, now both a professional opinion and interpretative data modelling is a standard in assessing and managing these environmental hazards. 

However, despite the significant annual financial expenditure (between 4 and 15% of all Buildings Insurance Claims in the past 5 years were attributed to subsidence) and the increasing visibility of the ‘Sinkhole’ phenomena, this shift in due diligence process has not been replicated in assessing the risks the ground pose. 

 

Coal mining and the need for interpretive analysis: A case study from Dudley, UK

Coal mining and the need for interpretive analysis: A case study from Dudley, UK

A sinkhole has formed during September 2015 on Bull Street, Lower Gornal Dudley, West Midlands. As a physical example of ground subsidence, the Bull Street Sinkhole (BSS) is hardly remarkable; with a diameter of >2ft and a depth of 6-9ft1, the BSS is a relic of historical mine workings, typical of those that form in the regions of the UK with a pronounced mining legacy.

In this instance, the degradation of historic shallow coal workings (the exploitation of coal seams at depths of <30m) triggered subsidence, though subsidence caused by the exploitation of a further 60 resources (tin, lead, copper, iron, sandstone, chalk and limestone just to name a few) is common across the UK.